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20121201
20121231
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they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
. they weren't always investing in american workers. they certainly weren't willing to make them in the u.s. auto industry. remember, it was just a few years ago that our auto industry was on the verge of collapse. gm, chrysler were all on the brink of failure. and if they failed, the suppliers and distributors that get their business from those companies, they would have died off, too. even ford could have gone down -- production halted. factories shuttered. once proud companies chopped up and sold off for scraps. and all of you -- the men and women who built these companies with your own hands -- would have been hung out to dry. and everybody in this community that depends on you -- restaurant owners, storekeepers, bartenders -- their livelihoods would have been at stake, too. so i wasn't about to let that happen. i placed my bet on american workers. we bet on american ingenuity. i'd make that same bet any day of the week. [applause] three and a half years later, that bet is paying off. this industry has added over a quarter of a million new jobs. assembly lines are humming again. the ame
of the national press club. secretary panetta will discuss the fed's policy and the challenges facing the u.s. military. who -- discusses defense policy and challenges facing the u.s. military. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> it is only when somebody had their own agenda. >> so much influence. >> i think they serve as a window on the path to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante. >> many of the women were writers, journalists. they wrote books. >> they were more interesting as human beings in many cases than their husbands, if only because they are not first and form of reform most defined by political ambitions. >> dolly madison loves every minute of the. monroe hated it. >> you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have. you could not. >> breathless and too much looking down and it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> she wrote in her memoir that she may never -- that she never made a dec
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was stan
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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